Conference

Geomorphometry Short Course at the EGU 2017, Vienna

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Only few days left until the EGU begins, the largest European annual geoscience meeting in Vienna. In case you attend you should consider to participate the short course in geomorphometry: Getting the most out of DEMs of Difference. The course is organized by Tobias Heckmann, Paolo Tarolli and me and will be on Wednesday, 26 April, 13:30-15:00 in Room N1.

Please see here for further details on the course’s aims and scope.

Digital Terrain Analysis of Anthropogenic Landscapes

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Paolo Tarolli, Tobias Heckmann and I have organized a workshop at the EGU. If you attend the EGU, consider participating this course on Wednesday, 20 Apr. 13:30-15:00 in Room L4/5.

Humans are among the most prominent geomorphic agents, redistributing land surface, and causing drastic changes to the geomorphic organization of the landscape (e.g. intensive agriculture, urbanization, mining, roads construction), with direct consequences on land degradation and watershed response.

workshop
Tarolli & Sofia 2016 (Geomorphology)

High-resolution topography (HRT) can be useful for engineered landscapes, where the anthropic forcing related to human activities may affect natural processes (Tarolli, 2014). HRT could play a strategic and helpful role, through the recognition of human-induced geomorphic and anthropogenic features, and the connected erosion.

In this workshop, we will explore various techniques to extract and analyze anthropogenic features from high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), and to account for the problems associated with such features in anthropogenic landscapes. Basic knowledge in Matlab® and GIS, and the availability of a laptop are an advantage but they are not a requirement to attend the workshop. Attendants at the beginning of the workshop will receive teaching materials and guidelines for the proposed methodologies.

Specifically, we will aim at:

  1. Extracting channel levees in floodplains, and terraces walls on hillslopes applying the semi-automatic techniques.
  2. Identifying terraces/road induced erosion/landslides.
  3. Automatic detection of bank erosion in agricultural drainage networks.

Upon course termination attendants will be awarded with a specific certificate of attendance signed by the EGU – GM division President and by the workshop Instructor.

References

Tarolli, P., Sofia, G. (2016). Human topographic signatures and derived geomorphic processes across landscapes. Geomorphology, 255, 140-161.

Tarolli, P. (2014). High-resolution topography for understanding Earth surface processes: opportunities and challenges. Geomorphology, 216, 295-312.

Involvement in EGU 2016 sessions and workshop

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“OMG, another year has passed. Time is running.” These are my thoughts as I start getting all the advertisements for EGU sessions via the common channels. Yes, it’s EGU time again, and I am again involved in a number of sessions which I like to quickly highlight here. Please consider submitting an abstract at TS3.1/GM4.5 and GM1.2/TS7.9. Also consider to take part at the workshop on digital terrain analysis headed by Paolo Tarolli (GM13.1/SC10/SSS12.25). This is a follow-up of my course in 2015.  See you in Vienna, 17–22 April 2016.


Interactions between tectonics and surface processes from mountain belts to basins

Convener: Alex Whittaker
Co-Conveners: Dirk Scherler, Wolfgang Schwanghart

The coupling between tectonics and surface processes fundamentally governs the dynamics of mountain belts and basins. A diverse range of geomorphic and sedimentary records including river long profiles, fluvial terraces, downstream fining trends, growth strata, sediment provenance, sequence stratigraphy and changing depositional environments have all provided first order constraints on the interactions between tectonics, erosion and deformation at the Earth’s surface. Additionally, the development of new methods to quantify erosion rates and source-to-sink sediment transfers from has enabled us to quantify with high resolution the teleconnections between surface processes, tectonics and climate at a range of temporal and spatial scales. Finally, the increasing integration of landscape evolution, stratigraphic and tectonic models has significantly improved our ability to explore how the rates and styles of deformation across diverse tectonic settings are recorded by the surface process system. These advances now make it possible to renew our understanding of the interactions between surface processes and tectonic deformation.

We invite contributions that use geomorphic or sedimentary records to understand tectonic deformation, and we welcome studies that address the interactions and couplings between tectonics and surface processes at a range of scales. In particular, we encourage coupled catchment-basin studies that take advantage of new numerical/physical modeling methods, geochemical tools for quantifying rates of surface processes (TCN, A-ZFT, OSL) and high resolution digital topographic and subsurface data. We also encourage field or subsurface structural and geomorphic studies of landscape evolution, sedimentary patterns and provenance in deformed settings, and contributions which address the role of surface processes in modulating rates of deformation and tectonic style.


Mind the Gap! Scaling issues in Geosciences

Convener: Jan Blöthe
Co-Conveners: Henry Munack, Sabine Kraushaar, Wolfgang Schwanghart, Jonathan Phillips

Research in geosciences inherently looks at different scales, often crossing several orders of magnitude – from grains to continents, from seconds to Millions of years, and from hardly noticeable processes to those with catastrophic behavior.

Depending on the scale, results might point in very different directions, making it difficult to connect, compare and predict observations across scales. Concomitantly, additional challenges arise from the likely increase of data scatter. This highlights the community-wide relevance of the topic. So, how can we overcome the gap between findings on very different spatio-temporal scales?

We, invite presentations from all realms of geoscientific research that face the challenges to work on different scales and to up- or downscale the results obtained. The session aims at emphasizing the challenges (and chances) arising from the combination and interpretation of the results obtained on different scales, from small to large, from short to long. We welcome contributions dealing with innovative sampling methods, new applications of traded methodical approaches or innovative methodical combinations, statistical or numerical approaches, and conceptual models that tackle scaling issues.


Digital Terrain Analysis of Anthropogenic Landscapes

Convener: Paolo Tarolli
Co-Conveners: Wolfgang Schwanghart, Tobias Heckmann

Humans are among the most prominent geomorphic agents, redistributing land surface, and causing drastic changes to the geomorphic organization of the landscape (e.g. intensive agriculture, urbanization), with direct consequences on land degradation and watershed response. High-resolution topography (HRT) can be useful for engineered landscapes, where the anthropic forcing related to human activities (e.g. urbanization, road network, and agricultural practices) may affect natural processes (Tarolli, 2014). HRT could play a really strategic and helpful role, through the recognition of human-induced geomorphic and anthropogenic features, and the connected erosion.

In this workshop, we will explore various techniques to extract and analyze anthropogenic features from high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), and to account for the problems associated with such features in anthropogenic landscapes. We will use different softwares (e.g. Matlab® and commercial/open GIS), and we will go through the entire work flow including extracting the features and analyzing the induced processes.

Specifically, we will aim at:
1. Extracting channel levees in floodplains, and terraces walls on hillslopes applying the semi-automatic techniques by Sofia et al. (2014) and Tarolli et al. (2014);
2. Identifying terraces/road induced erosion/landslides according to the index proposed by Tarolli et al. (2015);
3. Automatic detection of bank erosion in agricultural drainage networks (Prosdocimi et al., 2015).

Basic knowledge in Matlab® and GIS, and the availability of a laptop are an advantage but they are not a requirement to attend the workshop. Attendants at the beginning of the workshop will receive teaching materials and guidelines for the proposed methodologies.

Upon course termination attendants will be awarded with a specific certificate of attendance signed by the EGU – GM division President and by the workshop Instructor.

References
Prosdocimi, M., Sofia, G., Dalla Fontana, G., Tarolli, P. 2015. Bank erosion in agricultural drainage networks: effectiveness of Structure-from-Motion for post-event analysis. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. doi:10.1002/esp.3767.
Sofia G, Dalla Fontana G, Tarolli P. 2014. High-resolution topography and anthropogenic feature extraction: testing geomorphometric parameters in floodplains. Hydrological Processes 28: 2046-2061.
Tarolli P. 2014. High-resolution topography for understanding Earth surface processes: Opportunities and challenges. Geomorphology 216: 295-312.
Tarolli P, Preti F, Romano N. 2014. Terraced landscapes: From an old best practice to a potential hazard for soil degradation due to land abandonment. Anthropocene 6: 10-25.
Tarolli P, Sofia G, Calligaro S, Prosdocimi M, Preti F, Dalla Fontana G. 2015. Vineyards in terraced landscapes: new opportunities from lidar data. Land Degradation and Developement 26: 92–102.